Annual Exam

General medicine deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disorder and injury in animals.

ANNUAL CHECK UPS FOR A LIFETIME OF HEALTH

If you wait for your pet to show signs of pain before going to see your vet, you'll probably be waiting a long time and taking a big risk. If you see that their condition seems to be deteriorating, that they don't seem right; this probably means that the problem has already been around for a while.

An annual check up will allow your vet to determine what's up with your pet before your furry friend has to suffer. What exactly will the vet do during a complete annual exam? Among other things, they'll check your pet's temperature. It should vary between 38.3 and 39.1°C. The vet will also examine the skin and coat, the ears, eyes, teeth, paws, and nails. The vet will also perform an examination, using a stethoscope, to determine the general state of your pet's internal organs.

What's more, your pet's weight is also an important indicator of their health. Are they too fat? too thin? A proper check up will allow your vet to answer these questions.

This check up is also an opportunity for your family vet to ask you a few questions, notably about your pet's daily habits, such as their diet, the bond they share with you, with other members of your family, and with other animals.

During this meeting, don't hesitate to ask questions and ask for advice, especially about what kind of diet you should follow. This is also the ideal time to update any vaccinations, if necessary.

MAKING THE RIGHT DIAGNOSIS

The wellbeing of the companion with whom you share your days, evenings? your life? is something you take very much to heart. Nothing makes you feel better than to see your furry friend playful, happy and healthy. And as you well know, any change in appearance, behaviour or attitude can be cause for concern.

Because prevention is worth the proverbial pound of cure, annual visits to your family veterinarian are certainly recommended. These visits include a yearly exam and vaccination (which are often done at the same time). However, if something changes or strange symptoms crop up, you'll want to know why. For your peace of mind, don't hesitate: consult your vet right away.

After listening to your observations, your family vet will perform tests, using advanced tools, similar to those found in human medicine. Among others, laboratory tests include:

  • stool (e.g.: presence of parasites);
  • urine (e.g.: looking for struvite crystals);
  • blood (e.g.: checking liver condition).

Your vet will use various tools, equipment and techniques. For instance, X-rays allow for the accurate, reliable and conclusive diagnosis of many debilitating conditions, such as osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia. Furthermore, ultrasound is now very common in clinics and veterinary hospitals. Your vet might perform an ultrasound to obtain additional information, since it can used to see what's going on in the abdomen. A form of ultrasound can also be used to facilitate the auscultation (listening) of internal organs, with images that are much more precise than X-rays. What's more, this technique makes multiple diagnoses possible. For instance, if your female is expecting, your family vet will know from the very first weeks of gestation.

So, if you're worried that the pet that means so much to you isn't in tip top shape, rest assured that your vet has the right tools to make the right diagnosis.

ANNUAL CHECK UPS FOR A LIFETIME OF HEALTH

If you wait for your pet to show signs of pain before going to see your vet, you'll probably be waiting a long time and taking a big risk. If you see that their condition seems to be deteriorating, that they don't seem right; this probably means that the problem has already been around for a while.

An annual check up will allow your vet to determine what's up with your pet before your furry friend has to suffer. What exactly will the vet do during a complete annual exam? Among other things, they'll check your pet's temperature. It should vary between 38.3 and 39.1°C. The vet will also examine the skin and coat, the ears, eyes, teeth, paws, and nails. The vet will also perform an examination, using a stethoscope, to determine the general state of your pet's internal organs.

What's more, your pet's weight is also an important indicator of their health. Are they too fat? too thin? A proper check up will allow your vet to answer these questions.

This check up is also an opportunity for your family vet to ask you a few questions, notably about your pet's daily habits, such as their diet, the bond they share with you, with other members of your family, and with other animals.

During this meeting, don't hesitate to ask questions and ask for advice, especially about what kind of diet you should follow. This is also the ideal time to update any vaccinations, if necessary.

MAKING THE RIGHT DIAGNOSIS

The wellbeing of the companion with whom you share your days, evenings? your life? is something you take very much to heart. Nothing makes you feel better than to see your furry friend playful, happy and healthy. And as you well know, any change in appearance, behaviour or attitude can be cause for concern.

Because prevention is worth the proverbial pound of cure, annual visits to your family veterinarian are certainly recommended. These visits include a yearly exam and vaccination (which are often done at the same time). However, if something changes or strange symptoms crop up, you'll want to know why. For your peace of mind, don't hesitate: consult your vet right away.

After listening to your observations, your family vet will perform tests, using advanced tools, similar to those found in human medicine. Among others, laboratory tests include:

  • stool (e.g.: presence of parasites);
  • urine (e.g.: looking for struvite crystals);
  • blood (e.g.: checking liver condition).

Your vet will use various tools, equipment and techniques. For instance, X-rays allow for the accurate, reliable and conclusive diagnosis of many debilitating conditions, such as osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia. Furthermore, ultrasound is now very common in clinics and veterinary hospitals. Your vet might perform an ultrasound to obtain additional information, since it can used to see what's going on in the abdomen. A form of ultrasound can also be used to facilitate the auscultation (listening) of internal organs, with images that are much more precise than X-rays. What's more, this technique makes multiple diagnoses possible. For instance, if your female is expecting, your family vet will know from the very first weeks of gestation.

So, if you're worried that the pet that means so much to you isn't in tip top shape, rest assured that your vet has the right tools to make the right diagnosis.

ANNUAL CHECK UPS FOR A LIFETIME OF HEALTH

If you wait for your pet to show signs of pain before going to see your vet, you'll probably be waiting a long time and taking a big risk. If you see that their condition seems to be deteriorating, that they don't seem right; this probably means that the problem has already been around for a while.

An annual check up will allow your vet to determine what's up with your pet before your furry friend has to suffer. What exactly will the vet do during a complete annual exam? Among other things, they'll check your pet's temperature. It should vary between 38.3 and 39.1°C. The vet will also examine the skin and coat, the ears, eyes, teeth, paws, and nails. The vet will also perform an examination, using a stethoscope, to determine the general state of your pet's internal organs.

What's more, your pet's weight is also an important indicator of their health. Are they too fat? too thin? A proper check up will allow your vet to answer these questions.

This check up is also an opportunity for your family vet to ask you a few questions, notably about your pet's daily habits, such as their diet, the bond they share with you, with other members of your family, and with other animals.

During this meeting, don't hesitate to ask questions and ask for advice, especially about what kind of diet you should follow. This is also the ideal time to update any vaccinations, if necessary.

MAKING THE RIGHT DIAGNOSIS

The wellbeing of the companion with whom you share your days, evenings? your life? is something you take very much to heart. Nothing makes you feel better than to see your furry friend playful, happy and healthy. And as you well know, any change in appearance, behaviour or attitude can be cause for concern.

Because prevention is worth the proverbial pound of cure, annual visits to your family veterinarian are certainly recommended. These visits include a yearly exam and vaccination (which are often done at the same time). However, if something changes or strange symptoms crop up, you'll want to know why. For your peace of mind, don't hesitate: consult your vet right away.

After listening to your observations, your family vet will perform tests, using advanced tools, similar to those found in human medicine. Among others, laboratory tests include:

  • stool (e.g.: presence of parasites);
  • urine (e.g.: looking for struvite crystals);
  • blood (e.g.: checking liver condition).

Your vet will use various tools, equipment and techniques. For instance, X-rays allow for the accurate, reliable and conclusive diagnosis of many debilitating conditions, such as osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia. Furthermore, ultrasound is now very common in clinics and veterinary hospitals. Your vet might perform an ultrasound to obtain additional information, since it can used to see what's going on in the abdomen. A form of ultrasound can also be used to facilitate the auscultation (listening) of internal organs, with images that are much more precise than X-rays. What's more, this technique makes multiple diagnoses possible. For instance, if your female is expecting, your family vet will know from the very first weeks of gestation.

So, if you're worried that the pet that means so much to you isn't in tip top shape, rest assured that your vet has the right tools to make the right diagnosis.